What the media said….

Daily Telegraph 10 June 2015

‘Until the 1920s Kalkan was a tiny Greek fishing village; by the 1980s it had morphed into a bohemian resort for arty Turks fleeing big city life. Some of its past has clung on despite its transformation into a sophisticated resort favoured by Brits. They are drawn by its beguiling setting, dropping down a hillside to a small yacht harbour fronting a picturesque bay, pretty fishermen’s cottages, cosy restaurants and chic café-bars. Kalkan is also appreciated for what isn’t here – no rowdy bars, no clubs, no full English breakfasts. The village beach is small, but the sands of Patara are very close, as is stunning Kaputas.’

Trip Advisor

‘Situated by a harbour at the foot of the Taurus mountains, Kalkan is a resort for those seeking a little more than sun, sea and sand. It is a sophisticated historic town with some fine examples of Ottoman Greek architecture. As well as water sports, diving and boat trips, there are excellent restaurants and shops offering the highest in quality. Why not dine at a restaurant with a roof terrace that affords a picturesque view of the harbour? Or shop for antiques, oriental carpets, jewellery or furnishings. If you are feeling like having a swim, Kaputas beach and French Bay are both within easy reach of Kalkan. For those looking for a thrill, try canyoning in the Kaputas Gorge just four miles away.’

Daily Mail 7 February 2014

‘Kalkan’s more obvious charms…the little port is packed with gulets, converted fishing boats and assorted pleasure craft touting for human cargo with the promise of ‘dining under the stars’, ‘all-day trips of magic’ and such like. Banked steeply above the harbour – with the Taurus mountains behind – the rest of the mainly car-free town variously purrs and fizzes, its limestone streets and alleyways polished to a sheen by millions of feet over hundreds of years. Roof-top restaurants vie for business but you never feel hassled by frontmen wearing dodgy bow ties as you do in other tourist hubs.’

Lonely Planet

‘Kalkan is a well-to-do harbourside town built largely on hills that look down on an almost perfect bay. It’s as justly famous for its excellent restaurants as its small but central beach….Look for Kalkan’s charms in the compact old town.’

The Times 26 July 2014

‘It’s changed from a little village to an oddly English resort, but away from the harbour its old magic is still there. Night-time. Isn’t that always when magic happens? I sit on my tiny wooden balcony, on a sleepy backstreet in Kalkan’s pretty old town, and smell the jasmine and lavender wafting up from the garden below. Music drifts on the warm air; jazz seeping down from a rooftop restaurant, blurring with something pacier from the Moonlight bar, where I can picture the tables set neatly on the street, barmen whisking between them with dewy glasses of cold Efes and crisp, white Cankaya wine. There’s something in the air in Kalkan.’

Rough Guides

‘A mesmerizing mix of the exotic and the familiar, Turkey is much more than its clichéd image of a “bridge between East and West”. Invaded and settled from every direction since the start of recorded history, it combines influences from the Middle East and the Mediterranean, the Balkans and Central Asia. Mosques coexist with churches, Roman theatres and temples crumble near ancient Hittite cities, and dervish ceremonies and gypsy festivals are as much a part of the social landscape as classical music concerts or football matches.

The friendliness of the Turkish people makes visiting a pleasure; indeed you risk causing offence by declining invitations, and find yourself making friends through the simplest of transactions. At the big resorts and tourist spots, of course, this can merely be an excuse to sell you something, but elsewhere, despite a history in which outsiders have so often brought trouble, the warmth and generosity are genuine.’

 

 

 

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